Fact or Fiction

Celtic Run Fact or Fiction – Explore Places from the Book

Spoiler alert: The items mentioned below may reveal clues or details about the book.
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The Dingle Peninsula and Village

Fact: Called “the most beautiful place on earth” by National Geographic Traveler, the Dingle peninsula boasts an impressive coastline, rugged mountain ranges, and historic monuments. The town of Dingle was the launching point for many cross-Atlantic journeys, and its architecture and old European charm are unrivaled.

Fiction: Maggie O’Connell and her parents are fictitious characters.

This old watch tower stands guard outside Dingle

This old watch tower stands guard outside Dingle

Dingle’s diverse coastline contains smooth beaches and treacherous cliffs

The peninsula's diverse coastline contains smooth beaches and treacherous cliffs

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Santa Maria de La Rosa

Fact: The Santa Maria de la Rosa was a ship in the Spanish Armada. After suffering a defeat by England’s Sir Francis Drake, many ships traveled up to Ireland, where the brutal Atlantic weather caused further damage and loss. The Santa Maria de la Rosa sank in Blasket Sound on September 11, 1588, after foundering against some rocks.

Fiction: There is no record listing treasure or gold on the Santa Maria de la Rosa. However, as discovered in recent marine expeditions, gold and silver coins were carried on ships of the Armada. The captain of the Santa Maria de la Rosa was not known to have debts in Spain and it was not a mutiny that caused the ship to drift into the rocks.

Blasket Sound as seen from Slea Head on the Dingle Peninsula

Blasket Sound as seen from Slea Head on the Dingle Peninsula

Learn more (search on de la Rosa to find specific text and pictures of the ship)

Skellig Michael

Fact: Skellig Michael was an active monastery from 600 CE through the 12th century. George Bernard Shaw summarized the Skellig Islands best in his quote “… the most fantastic and impossible rock in the world … the thing does not belong to any world that you and I have lived and worked in; it is part of our dream world.

There are more than 600 steps leading from the base of the island to the stone huts of the monastery nearly 700 feet above the ocean. Today the islands are home to more than 27,000 gannet birds, creating a remarkable nature and cultural experience.

Fiction: There is no clue or piece of a treasure map under the 100th step.

Skellig Michael Steps

Skellig Michael steps

Skellig Island rises out of the ocean in dramatic fashion

The Skellig Islands rise out of the ocean in dramatic fashion

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Mt. Brandon

Fact: Named for St. Brendan the navigator, Mt. Brandon is more than 3,000 feet high. Thousands of people climb Mt. Brandon each year to take in the amazing scenery.

Fiction: Legend has it that St. Brendan climbed the mountain to see the Americas prior to setting sail on his historic voyage. There is no rock formation that looks like a window frame, and although you can see hundreds of miles on a clear day, you can’t see Spain.

Learn more | Mount Brandon on Wikipedia

Clochans

Fact: There are thousands of ancient stone beehive huts called Clochans throughout Ireland. These huts were built during the Middle Ages.

Fiction: There is no clochan that contains an entrance to a secret cave.

Stone hut dating back to the Middle Ages

A stone hut dating back to the Middle Ages

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Crag Cave

Fact: There are many caves in Ireland. Crag cave is one of the most popular. Located in Castleisland County Kerry on the Dingle Peninsula, Crag cave is 3.8 kilometers long. You can go on a tour and see 400 meters of the cave, which contains impressive pillars, stalagmites, and stalactites.

Fiction: The cave in which the kids find the treasure does not exist.

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